ERNST LUDWIG KIRCHNER by Bob Kessel

All true artists, whether they know it or not, create from a place of no-mind, from inner stillness.

– Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

 

kirchner_selbstbildnis-mit-modell

SELF PORTRAIT WITH MODEL by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

kirchner-robe-bob-kessel

ARTIST WITH MODEL by Bob Kessel

Born May 6, 1880, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner studied architecture and painting before forming the artists’ group Die Brücke (“The Bridge”) in Dresden on 7 June 1905, with Fritz Bleyl, Erich Heckel, and Karl Schmidt-Rottluff. Kirchner moved to Berlin in 1911, and within two years the group split.

Kirchner worked at a feverish pace, producing art that drew its subject matter from his studio life with artist friends and models, the street and nightclub life of the city, and summer trips to beaches. His works were exhibited and collected from 1905, and by the mid-teens Kirchner had a number of devoted collectors, both private and institutional.

At the outbreak of World War I in 1914, Kirchner joined the German army, but eventually suffered a nervous breakdown. Despite ill health and struggles to recover, he continued to produce major paintings, prints, drawings and sculpture. In 1917 he moved to Davos, Switzerland, and began to include in his work images of rural life and the surrounding Alps. Through the 1920s major exhibitions of his work were held in Berlin, Frankfurt, Dresden, and other cities. In 1931 he was made a member of the Prussian Academy.

Labeled a degenerate artist by the Nazis, Kirchner was asked to resign from the Berlin Academy of Arts in 1933. In 1937, more than 600 of his works were confiscated from German museums and were either destroyed or sold, many ending up in America. In 1938 the psychological suffering caused by the Nazi authorities rejecting him as “un-German,” the dispersal and destruction of his works, and the Nazi occupation of Austria so close to his home in Davos led to Kirchner’s suicide.

changs-and-kay-with-bob-kessel-art

BERLIN FRAU  print by Bob Kessel exhibited at gallery show

Bob Kessel has created an art series based on the works of Ernst Ludwig Kirchner like in the print shown below titled, “BERLIN FRAU”. They are available as signed and numbered limited edition fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for pricing and availability.

kirchner-berlin-frau-bob-kessel

BERLIN FRAU by Bob Kessel

kirchner-green-girl-bob-kessel

GREEN GIRL by Bob Kessel

kirchner-franzi-bob-kessel

FRANZI by Bob Kessel

kirchner-bare-back-bob-kessel

BARE BACK by Bob Kessel

_

brucke-nakte-madchen-bob-kessel

BRUCKE MADCHEN by Bob Kessel

_

zwei-nacktes-bob-kessel

ZWEI NACKTEN FRAUEN by Bob Kessel

 

 

BARNETT NEWMAN by Bob Kessel

hall-light-bob-kessel

HALL LIGHT WITH BARNETT NEWMAN PAINTING ON WALL by Bob Kessel
after Barnett Newman

Barnett Newman 1905 – 1970 was an American artist. He is seen as one of the major figures in abstract expressionism and one of the foremost of the color field painters.

Newman was born in New York City, the son of Jewish immigrants from Russian Poland. He studied philosophy at the City College of New York and worked in his father’s business manufacturing clothing. From the 1930s he made paintings, said to be in an expressionist style, but eventually destroyed all these works.

A well respected writer and critic who also organized exhibitions and wrote catalogs, Newman later became a member of the Uptown Group.

“ What is the explanation of the seemingly insane drive of man to be painter and poet if it is not an act of defiance against mans fall and an assertion that he return to the Garden of Eden? For the artists are the first men. ”

— Barnett Newman

newman-vir-heroicus-sublimis

VIR HEROICUS SUBLIMIS by Barnett Newman

Newman’s late works, such as the Who’s Afraid of Red, Yellow and Blue series, use vibrant, pure colors, often on very large canvases – Anna’s Light (1968), named in memory of his mother who had died in 1965, is his largest work, twenty-eight feet wide by nine feet tall.

Newman is generally classified as an abstract expressionist on account of his working in New York City in the 1950s, associating with other artists of the group and developing an abstract style which owed little or nothing to European art. However, his rejection of the expressive brushwork employed by other abstract expressionists such as Clyfford Still and Mark Rothko, and his use of hard-edged areas of flat color, can be seen as a precursor to post painterly abstraction and the minimalist works of artists such as Frank Stella.

Newman was unappreciated as an artist for much of his life, being overlooked in favour of more colorful characters such as Jackson Pollock. The influential critic Clement Greenberg wrote enthusiastically about him, but it was not until the end of his life that he began to be taken really seriously. He was, however, an important influence on many younger painters.