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DIAMOND MONET’S HAYSTACKS by BobKessel
Jul 28th, 2010 by admin

“For me, a landscape does not exist in its own right,
since its appearance changes at every moment;
but the surrounding atmosphere brings it to life–
the light and the air which vary continually.”

- Claude Monet

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DIAMOND HAYSTACK (blue) by Bob Kessel

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DIAMOND HAYSTACK (green) by Bob Kessel

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MONET’S HAYSTACK by Bob Kessel

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MONET’S HAYSTACKS by Bob Kessel

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MONET’S HAYSTACK BIG by Bob Kessel

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MONET’S HAYSTACK SHADOW by Bob Kessel

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MONET’S HAYSTACK PINK by Bob Kessel

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2 MONET HAYSTACKS by Bob Kessel

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MEULES paintings by Bob Kessel after Claude Monet

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From TWO FOR THE MONET art series by Bob Kessel

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MEULES by Bob Kessel

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HAY IN FIELD by Bob Kessel

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HAYSTACK by Bob Kessel

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BRUSH STACKS by Bob Kessel

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GRAINSTACKS A by Bob Kessel

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GRAINSTACKS B by Bob Kessel

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GRAINSTACKS C by Bob Kessel

“MONET’S HAYSTACKS” art series by Bob Kessel, can be purchased as a signed and numbered limited edition original fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for prices and availability.

Haystacks is the title of a series of impressionist paintings by Claude Monet. The primary subjects of all of the paintings in the series are stacks of hay that have been stacked in the field after the harvest season. The title refers primarily to a twenty-five canvas series begun the autumn of 1890 and continued through the following spring, using that year’s harvest. Some use a broader definition of the title to refer to other paintings by Monet with this same theme. The series is known for its thematic use of repetition to show differences in perception of light across various times of day, seasons, and types of weather. The subjects were painted in fields near Monet’s home in Giverny, France.

The series is among Monet’s most notable works. Although the largest collections of Monet’s work are held in Paris at the Musée d’Orsay and Musée Marmottan Monet, Boston, Massachusetts at the Museum of Fine Arts, New York City at the Metropolitan Museum and Museum of Modern Art and Tokyo at the National Museum of Western Art, six of the twenty-five haystacks pieces are currently housed at the Art Institute of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois, United States The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts, United States holds two, and The Louvre in Paris, France holds one. Other museums that hold parts of this series in their collection include the Hill-Stead Museum in Farmington, Connecticut (which also has one of five from the earlier 1888-9 harvest), National Gallery of Scotland in Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom, Minneapolis Institute of Arts in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States, Kunsthaus Zürich in Zürich, Switzerland, and Shelburne Museum, Shelburne, Vermont, United States.

Monet settled in Giverny in 1883. Most of his paintings from 1883 until his death 40 years later were of scenes within 2 miles of his home. Indeed, the haystacks themselves were situated just outside his door. He was intensely aware of and fascinated by the visual nuances of the region’s landscape and the variation in the seasons.

Monet had already painted the same subject in different moods. However, as he matured as a painter, his depictions of atmospheric influences were increasingly concerned not only with specific effects, but with overall color harmonies that allowed for an autonomous use of rich color. The conventional wisdom was that the compact, solid haystacks were both a simple subject and an unimaginative one. However, contemporary writers and friends of the artist noted that Monet’s subject matter was always carefully chosen, the product of careful thought and analysis. Monet undertook a study of capturing their vibrance under direct light, and juxtaposing the same subject from the same view in more muted atmospheric conditions. It was not unusual for Monet to alter the canvases back in his studio, in search of harmonious transitions within the series.

The Haystacks series was a financial success. Fifteen of these were exhibited by Durand-Ruel in May 1891, and every painting sold within days. The exhibit met with great public acclaim. Octave Mirbeau described Monet’s daring series as representing “what lies beyond progress itself.” Others described the grainstacks as “faces of the landscape,” and viewers seemed to take assurance that the series would help preserve rural traditions despite industrialization and urbanization. They represented the countryside as a retreat from daily problems and home for contentment with nature. Camille Pissarro said “These canvases breathe contentment.” Most of the paintings sold immediately for as much as 1,000 francs. Additionally, Monet’s prices in general began to rise steeply. As a result, he was able to buy outright the house and grounds at Giverny and to start constructing a waterlily pond. After years of mere subsistence living he was able to enjoy success.

DEGAS APRES LE BAIN by Bob Kessel
Jun 27th, 2010 by admin

Edgar Degas,  1834-1917, was a French artist, acknowledged as the master of drawing the human figure in motion. Degas worked in many mediums, preferring pastel to all others. He is perhaps best known for his paintings, drawings, and bronzes of ballerinas and of race horses.

Degas’ style reflects his deep respect for the old masters (he was an enthusiastic copyist well into middle age) and his great admiration for Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres and Eugène Delacroix. He was also a collector of Japanese prints, whose compositional principles influenced his work.

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ORANGE BATHER ALA DEGAS by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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APRES LE BAIN by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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The art of Degas reflects a concern for the psychology of movement and expression and the harmony of line and continuity of contour. These characteristics set Degas apart from the other impressionist painters, although he took part in all but one of the 8 impressionist exhibitions between 1874 and 1886. Degas was the son of a wealthy banker, and his aristocratic family background instilled into his early art a haughty yet sensitive quality of detachment. As he grew up, his idol was the painter Jean Auguste Ingres, whose example pointed him in the direction of a classical draftsmanship, stressing balance and clarity of outline. After beginning his artistic studies with Louis Lamothes, a pupil of Ingres, he started classes at the Ecole des Beaux Arts but left in 1854 and went to Italy. He stayed there for 5 years, studying Italian art, especially Renaissance works.

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APRES LE TUB by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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As his financial situation improved through sales of his own work, he was able to indulge his passion for collecting works by artists he admired: old masters such as El Greco and such contemporaries as Manet, Pissarro, Cézanne, Gauguin, and Van Gogh. Three artists he idolized, Ingres, Delacroix, and Daumier, were especially well represented in his collection.

For all the stylistic evolution, certain features of Degas’s work remained the same throughout his life. He always painted indoors, preferring to work in his studio, either from memory or using models. The figure remained his primary subject; his few landscapes were produced from memory or imagination. It was not unusual for him to repeat a subject many times, varying the composition or treatment. He was a deliberative artist whose works, as Andrew Forge has written, “were prepared, calculated, practiced, developed in stages. They were made up of parts. The adjustment of each part to the whole, their linear arrangement, was the occasion for infinite reflection and experiment.”Degas himself explained, “In art, nothing should look like chance, not even movement”.

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FEMME APRES LE BAIN by Edgar Degas

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The Dreyfus Affair, which divided Paris from the 1890s to the early 1900s, further intensified his anti-Semitism. By the mid 1890s, he had broken off relations with all of his Jewish friends, publicly disavowed his previous friendships with Jewish artists, and refused to use models who he believed might be Jewish. He remained an outspoken anti-Semite and member of the anti-Semitic “Anti-Dreyfusards” until his death.

His argumentative nature was deplored by Renoir, who said of him: “What a creature he was, that Degas! All his friends had to leave him; I was one of the last to go, but even I couldn’t stay till the end.”

Although he is known to have been working in pastel as late as the end of 1907, and is believed to have continued making sculpture as late as 1910, he apparently ceased working in 1912, when the impending demolition of his longtime residence on the rue Victor Massé forced a wrenching move to quarters on the boulevard de Clichy. He never married and spent the last years of his life, nearly blind, restlessly wandering the streets of Paris before dying in 1917.

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DEGAS BACK BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS BEND BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS SPONGE BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS SOAP BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS WIPE BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS TOWEL BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS TOWELING OFF BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS TOWEL WIPE BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

MARTIAN by Bob Kessel
Apr 22nd, 2010 by admin

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MARTIAN by Bob Kessel

Bob Kessel’s art series “POP UNINTENTIONAL” is based on comic book characters like Spiderman, Batman and Dr. Strange. This picture and many others, can be purchased as signed and numbered limited edition original fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for prices and availability.

DIAMOND RED NUDES by Bob Kessel
Apr 5th, 2010 by admin

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DIAMOND RED NUDES by Bob Kessel

“DIAMOND RED NUDES” by Bob Kessel, based on the works of Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and the Die Brucke artists, can be purchased as a signed and numbered limited edition original fine art print. Contact Bob Kessel for prices and availability.

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