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Pierre-Auguste Renoir by Bob Kessel
Feb 24th, 2012 by admin

Pierre-Auguste Renoir by Bob Kessel

See more ARTISTS ON ART quotes here

Pierre-Auguste Renoir was born February 25, 1841 in Limoges, Haute-Vienne, France.

Renoir’s paintings are notable for their vibrant light and saturated color, most often focusing on people in intimate and candid compositions. The female nude was one of his primary subjects. In characteristic Impressionist style, Renoir suggested the details of a scene through freely brushed touches of color, so that his figures softly fuse with one another and their surroundings.

In the late 1860s, through the practice of painting light and water en plein air (in the open air), he and his friend Claude Monet discovered that the color of shadows is not brown or black, but the reflected color of the objects surrounding them, an effect today known as diffuse reflection. Several pairs of paintings exist in which Renoir and Monet, working side-by-side, depicted the same scenes (La Grenouillère, 1869).

In 1890, he married Aline Victorine Charigot, who, along with a number of the artist’s friends, had already served as a model for Le Déjeuner des canotiers (Luncheon of the Boating Party, 1881), and with whom he already had a child, Pierre, in 1885. After his marriage, Renoir painted many scenes of his wife and daily family life, including their children and their nurse, Aline’s cousin Gabrielle Renard. The Renoirs had three sons, one of whom, Jean, became a filmmaker of note and another, Pierre, became a stage and film actor. He died December 3,  1919 at the age of 78.

A prolific artist, he made several thousand paintings. The warm sensuality of Renoir’s style made his paintings some of the most well-known and frequently-reproduced works in the history of art.

DIAMOND MONET’S HAYSTACKS by BobKessel
Jul 28th, 2010 by admin

“For me, a landscape does not exist in its own right,
since its appearance changes at every moment;
but the surrounding atmosphere brings it to life–
the light and the air which vary continually.”

- Claude Monet

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DIAMOND HAYSTACK (blue) by Bob Kessel

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DIAMOND HAYSTACK (green) by Bob Kessel

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MONET’S HAYSTACK by Bob Kessel

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MONET’S HAYSTACKS TWO by Bob Kessel

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MONET’S HAYSTACKS by Bob Kessel

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MONET’S HAYSTACK BIG by Bob Kessel

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diamond-monet-haystack-shadow-bob-kessel

MONET’S HAYSTACK SHADOW by Bob Kessel

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MONET’S HAYSTACK PINK by Bob Kessel

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2 MONET HAYSTACKS by Bob Kessel

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MEULES paintings by Bob Kessel after Claude Monet

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From TWO FOR THE MONET art series by Bob Kessel

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MEULES by Bob Kessel

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HAY IN FIELD by Bob Kessel

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HAYSTACK by Bob Kessel

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BRUSH STACKS by Bob Kessel

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GRAINSTACKS A by Bob Kessel

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GRAINSTACKS B by Bob Kessel

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GRAINSTACKS C by Bob Kessel

“MONET’S HAYSTACKS” art series by Bob Kessel, can be purchased as a signed and numbered limited edition original fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for prices and availability.

Haystacks is the title of a series of impressionist paintings by Claude Monet. The primary subjects of all of the paintings in the series are stacks of hay that have been stacked in the field after the harvest season. The title refers primarily to a twenty-five canvas series begun the autumn of 1890 and continued through the following spring, using that year’s harvest. Some use a broader definition of the title to refer to other paintings by Monet with this same theme. The series is known for its thematic use of repetition to show differences in perception of light across various times of day, seasons, and types of weather. The subjects were painted in fields near Monet’s home in Giverny, France.

The series is among Monet’s most notable works. Although the largest collections of Monet’s work are held in Paris at the Musée d’Orsay and Musée Marmottan Monet, Boston, Massachusetts at the Museum of Fine Arts, New York City at the Metropolitan Museum and Museum of Modern Art and Tokyo at the National Museum of Western Art, six of the twenty-five haystacks pieces are currently housed at the Art Institute of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois, United States The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts, United States holds two, and The Louvre in Paris, France holds one. Other museums that hold parts of this series in their collection include the Hill-Stead Museum in Farmington, Connecticut (which also has one of five from the earlier 1888-9 harvest), National Gallery of Scotland in Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom, Minneapolis Institute of Arts in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States, Kunsthaus Zürich in Zürich, Switzerland, and Shelburne Museum, Shelburne, Vermont, United States.

Monet settled in Giverny in 1883. Most of his paintings from 1883 until his death 40 years later were of scenes within 2 miles of his home. Indeed, the haystacks themselves were situated just outside his door. He was intensely aware of and fascinated by the visual nuances of the region’s landscape and the variation in the seasons.

Monet had already painted the same subject in different moods. However, as he matured as a painter, his depictions of atmospheric influences were increasingly concerned not only with specific effects, but with overall color harmonies that allowed for an autonomous use of rich color. The conventional wisdom was that the compact, solid haystacks were both a simple subject and an unimaginative one. However, contemporary writers and friends of the artist noted that Monet’s subject matter was always carefully chosen, the product of careful thought and analysis. Monet undertook a study of capturing their vibrance under direct light, and juxtaposing the same subject from the same view in more muted atmospheric conditions. It was not unusual for Monet to alter the canvases back in his studio, in search of harmonious transitions within the series.

The Haystacks series was a financial success. Fifteen of these were exhibited by Durand-Ruel in May 1891, and every painting sold within days. The exhibit met with great public acclaim. Octave Mirbeau described Monet’s daring series as representing “what lies beyond progress itself.” Others described the grainstacks as “faces of the landscape,” and viewers seemed to take assurance that the series would help preserve rural traditions despite industrialization and urbanization. They represented the countryside as a retreat from daily problems and home for contentment with nature. Camille Pissarro said “These canvases breathe contentment.” Most of the paintings sold immediately for as much as 1,000 francs. Additionally, Monet’s prices in general began to rise steeply. As a result, he was able to buy outright the house and grounds at Giverny and to start constructing a waterlily pond. After years of mere subsistence living he was able to enjoy success.

DIAMOND HAYSTACKS by Bob Kessel
Oct 22nd, 2009 by admin

diamond-haystack-blue-bob-kessel

DIAMOND HAYSTACK (blue) by Bob Kessel

diamond-haystack-green-bob-kessel

DIAMOND HAYSTACK (green) by Bob Kessel

“DIAMOND HAYSTACK” by Bob Kessel, can be purchased as a signed and numbered limited edition original fine art print. Contact Bob Kessel for prices and availability.

Haystacks is the title of a series of impressionist paintings by Claude Monet. The primary subjects of all of the paintings in the series are stacks of hay that have been stacked in the field after the harvest season. The title refers primarily to a twenty-five canvas series begun the autumn of 1890 and continued through the following spring, using that year’s harvest. Some use a broader definition of the title to refer to other paintings by Monet with this same theme. The series is known for its thematic use of repetition to show differences in perception of light across various times of day, seasons, and types of weather. The subjects were painted in fields near Monet’s home in Giverny, France.

The series is among Monet’s most notable works. Although the largest collections of Monet’s work are held in Paris at the Musée d’Orsay and Musée Marmottan Monet, Boston, Massachusetts at the Museum of Fine Arts, New York City at the Metropolitan Museum and Museum of Modern Art and Tokyo at the National Museum of Western Art, six of the twenty-five haystacks pieces are currently housed at the Art Institute of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois, United States The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts, United States holds two, and The Louvre in Paris, France holds one. Other museums that hold parts of this series in their collection include the Hill-Stead Museum in Farmington, Connecticut (which also has one of five from the earlier 1888-9 harvest), National Gallery of Scotland in Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom, Minneapolis Institute of Arts in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States, Kunsthaus Zürich in Zürich, Switzerland, and Shelburne Museum, Shelburne, Vermont, United States.

Monet settled in Giverny in 1883. Most of his paintings from 1883 until his death 40 years later were of scenes within 2 miles of his home. Indeed, the haystacks themselves were situated just outside his door. He was intensely aware of and fascinated by the visual nuances of the region’s landscape and the variation in the seasons.

Monet had already painted the same subject in different moods. However, as he matured as a painter, his depictions of atmospheric influences were increasingly concerned not only with specific effects, but with overall color harmonies that allowed for an autonomous use of rich color. The conventional wisdom was that the compact, solid haystacks were both a simple subject and an unimaginative one. However, contemporary writers and friends of the artist noted that Monet’s subject matter was always carefully chosen, the product of careful thought and analysis. Monet undertook a study of capturing their vibrance under direct light, and juxtaposing the same subject from the same view in more muted atmospheric conditions. It was not unusual for Monet to alter the canvases back in his studio, in search of harmonious transitions within the series.

The Haystacks series was a financial success. Fifteen of these were exhibited by Durand-Ruel in May 1891, and every painting sold within days. The exhibit met with great public acclaim. Octave Mirbeau described Monet’s daring series as representing “what lies beyond progress itself.” Others described the grainstacks as “faces of the landscape,” and viewers seemed to take assurance that the series would help preserve rural traditions despite industrialization and urbanization. They represented the countryside as a retreat from daily problems and home for contentment with nature. Camille Pissarro said “These canvases breathe contentment.” Most of the paintings sold immediately for as much as 1,000 francs. Additionally, Monet’s prices in general began to rise steeply. As a result, he was able to buy outright the house and grounds at Giverny and to start constructing a waterlily pond. After years of mere subsistence living he was able to enjoy success.

2 FOR THE MONET
Aug 28th, 2009 by admin

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MEULES paintings by Bob Kessel after Claude Monet

“For me, a landscape does not exist in its own right, since its appearance changes at every moment; but the surrounding atmosphere brings it to life—the light and the air which vary continually.”

- Claude Monet

Bob Kessel’s art series “2 FOR THE MONET” features pictures based on Monet’s paintings like in the picture “MEULES” shown above. These pictures are available as signed and numbered limited edition fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for pricing and availability.

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PETITAILLY and POPLARS prints based on the works of Claude Monet by Bob Kessel

In the 1890s, Monet painted groups of huge canvases, some as large as 6 by 14 feet. He painted the same subject from the same angle at different times of day to discover how the changes in the quality of the light would change the shapes, mood and images of the chosen subject. In his journals, Monet recorded his method for working on the haystacks: he took multiple canvases to the field and worked for no longer than ten or fifteen minutes on each painting. As the angle of the sun changed, the colors and shadows changed, and Monet sought to paint exactly what he saw.

Claude Monet painted a series of paintings of the Palace of Westminster, home of the British Parliament, during his stay in London. The paintings have all the same size and viewpoint, Monet’s window at St Thomas’ Hospital overlooking the Thames. They are however painted at different times of the day and at different weather circumstances.

Monet produced numerous Haystack paintings. His earlier landscapes had included haystacks in an ancillary manner. Monet had also produced five paintings with haystacks as the primary subject during the 1888 harvest.

This series is one of Monet’s earliest that relied on thematic repetition to illustrate nuances in perception across natural variation such as times of day, seasons, and types of weather. For Monet, the concept of producing and exhibiting a series of paintings related by subject and vantage point began in 1889, with at least ten paintings done at the Valley of the Creuse, and subsequently shown at the Galerie Georges Petit. This interest in the serial motif would continue for the rest of his career.

Although the mundane subject was constant throughout this series, the underlying theme may be seen as the transience of light. This concept enabled him to use repetition to show nuances of perception as seasons, time of day, and weather changes. The constant subject provided the basis from which comparisons could be made in changes of light across this nuanced series. The first paintings in the series were started in late September or early October 1890, and he continued producing these paintings for about seven months. These paintings made Monet the first painter to paint such a large quantity of pictures of the same subject matter differentiated by light, weather, atmosphere and perspective.

Beginning in the 1880s and 1890s, Monet focused on Haystacks and a number of other subjects (other series included the Mornings on the Seine, Poplars, Rouen Cathedral, the Houses of Parliament, and the Water Lilies, among others).

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PETITAILLY

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

meules-monet-bob-kessel

MEULES

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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HAYSTACKS IN FIELD

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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HAYSTACK

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

brush-stacks-monet-bob-kessel

BRUSH STACKS

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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GRAINSTACKS A

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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GRAINSTACKS B

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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GRAINSTACKS C

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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POPLARS

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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MANNEPORTE

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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CUSTOMES

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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PARLIMENT

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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PARLIMENT 2

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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GIVERNY POND

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

See more Monet inspired prints by Bob Kessel by clicking here.

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