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REISSUED POSTERS BY BOB KESSEL
Aug 12th, 2016 by admin

REISSUED POSTERS BY BOB KESSEL

Limited edition posters of contemporary artist Bob Kessel have been reissued by popular demand.

Each Bob Kessel poster represents a sample from an art series
made up of several related pictures.

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artworks assemble! poster captain america by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL ARTWORKS ASSEMBLE! POSTER (Captain America)  30″ x 40″

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klimt verklempt poster tit for tat by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL KLIMT VERKLEMPT POSTER (Tit for Tat)  30″ x 40″

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mythology poster (judgement of paris) by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL MYTHOLOGY POSTER (Judgement of Paris)  30″ x 40″

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van gogh poster pipe by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL VAN GOGH POSTER (Pipe)  30″ x 40″

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horses poster (drei blaue pferde) by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL HORSES POSTER (Drei Blaue Pferde)  30″ x 40″

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art history poster fishbowl by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL ART HISTORY POSTER (Fishbowl)  30″ x 40″

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going for bruce poster jazzman by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL GOING FOR BRUCKE POSTER (Jazzman)  30″ x 40″

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girlymags poster confidential by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL GIRLYMAGS POSTER (Confidential)  30″ x 40″

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girly mags poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL GIRLY MAGS POSTER (Crouch)  30″ x 40″

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plein air poster (Copse) by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL PLEIN AIR POSTER (Copse)  30″ x 40″

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art over decor poster white chair by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL ART OVER DECOR POSTER (White Chair)  30″ x 40″

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art above decor poster black by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL ART OVER DECOR POSTER (Black Chair)  30″ x 40″

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fruits poster plat de troi fruits by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL FRUITS POSTER (Plat de Troi)  30″ x 40″

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fruits poster cerises by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL FRUITS POSTER (Cerises et Cinq)  30″ x 40″

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CEZANNES FRUITS poster (Douze) by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL CEZANNE’S FRUITS POSTER (Douze fruits) 30″ x 40″ 

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fruits poster compotier by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL CEZANNE’S FRUITS POSTER (Compotier) 30″ x 40″

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masters poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL MASTERS POSTER (Henri Matisse in Chapelle du Rosaire de Vence)  30″ x 40″

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masters poster cezanne by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL MASTERS POSTER (Cezanne)  30″ x 40″

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masters poster (Salvador Dali) by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL MASTERS POSTER (Dali)  30″ x 40″  

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masters poster mondrian by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL MASTERS POSTER (Mondrian)  30″ x 40″

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masters poster (Gauguin) by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL MASTERS POSTER (Gauguin)  30″ x 40″

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masters poster (Malevich) by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL MASTERS POSTER (Malevich)  30″ x 40″

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masters poster (Lautrec) by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL MASTERS POSTER (Lautrec)  30″ x 40″

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masters poster egon shiele by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL MASTERS POSTER (Egon Shiele)  30″ x 40″

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masters poster raphael by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL MASTERS POSTER (Raphael)  30″ x 40″

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masters poster rembrandt by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL MASTERS POSTER (Rembrandt)  30″ x 40″

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barbizon poster (Proteuse de fagots) by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL BARBIZON POSTER (Porteuse de fagots) 30″ x 40″

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barbizon poster planting by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL BARBIZON POSTER (Planting)  30″ x 40″

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art history poster tom girl by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL THE NUDE POSTER (Tom’s Girl Torso) 30″ x 40″ 

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the nude poster (Mel's Girl) by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL THE NUDE POSTER (Mel’s Girl Lucky Strike) 30″ X 40″ 

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the nude poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL THE NUDE POSTER (Woman at rest) 30″ x 40″ 

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die brucke poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL DIE BRUCKE POSTER (Green nude) 30″ x 40″ 

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minotaur poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL MINOTAUR POSTER (Red Eye) 30″ x 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL CHINESE PHILOSOPHERS POSTER (Su Tung Po) 30″ x 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL BONNARD POSTER (Orange girl) 30″ x 40″ 

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bonnard poster femme penchée by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL BONNARD POSTER (Femme Penchee) 30″ x 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL BIJIN 美人 POSTER (Washing hair) 30″ x 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL THE KISS POSTER (Apres Lautrec) 30″ x 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL CEZANNE IN PROVENCE POSTER (Cezanne portrait) 30″ x 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL MYTHOLOGY POSTER (Narcissus after Caravaggio) 30″ x 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL PULP POSTER (Gunsel) 30″ x 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL WOODSCAPES POSTER (Wood sunset) 30″ x 40″ 

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waterfalls poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL WATERFALLS POSTER (Falls viewing) 30″ x 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL ROMANTICISM POSTER (The siren and the fisherman) 30″ X 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL KAWAII かわいい POSTER (Lego porn) 30″ X 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL SHOW ME THE MONET POSTER (Giverny garden) 30″ X 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL FUTURISMO POSTER (Racer X) 30″ X 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL RECONSTRUCTING ROY POSTER (Masterpiece) 30″ X 40″ 

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baroque poster prodigal son by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL BAROQUE POSTER (Prodigal son) 30″ X 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL SHUNGA 春画 POSTER (Yellow man) 30″ X 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL ANIME POSTER (Kiss Kiss) 30″ X 40″ 

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artist models poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL ARTIST MODELS POSTER (Painting and model) 30″ X 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL GIVERNY POSTER (Giverny waters) 30″ X 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL PICASSO IN PARIS POSTER (Death of Casagemas) 30″ X 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL MADAME MATISSE POSTER (Chapeau) 30″ X 40″ 

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dancers poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL DANCERS (Pink Veils) POSTER  30″ x 40″ 

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dancers poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL DANCERS POSTER (Veils)  30″ x 40″  

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dancers poster orange veil by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL DANCERS POSTER (Orange Veil)  30″ x 40″

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couples poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL COUPLES (Japanese Couple) POSTER  30″ x 40″ 

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musclebeach poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL MUSCLE BEACH POSTER (Mickey Mouse ears) 30″ x 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL DEGAS DANCERS POSTER (First Position) 30″ x 40″ 

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INTERIORS POSTER BY BOB KESSEL

BOB KESSEL INTERIORS POSTER (iMac) 30″ x 40″ 

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TREESCAPES POSTER BY BOB KESSEL

BOB KESSEL TREESCAPES POSTER (Mezzo) 30″ x 40″ 

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SILVER SCREEN STARLET POSTER BY BOB KESSEL

BOB KESSEL SILVER SCREEN SIRENS POSTER (Silver Starlet) 30″ x 40″ 

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silver screen sirens (Marilyn) poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL SILVER SCREEN SIRENS POSTER (Marilyn)  30″ x 40″  

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BOB KESSEL BOB’S GOT WOOD POSTER (American Indian after Remington) 30″ x 40″ 

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klimt verklempt poster by bob kessel

BOB KESSEL KLIMT VERKLEMPT POSTER (Kneel and bob) 30″ X 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL CUTOUTS POSTER (Zulma) 30″ X 34″ 

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BOB KESSEL ARTWORKS ASSEMBLE! POSTER (Captain America) 30″ X 40″ 

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van gogh poster road to tarascon by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL VAN GOGH POSTER (The road to Tarascon) 30″ x 40″ 

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van gogh poster potato eaters by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL VAN GOGH POSTER (Potato Eaters)  30″ x 40″

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BOB KESSEL 100 VIEWS POSTER (富士山 Fuji fog) 30″ X 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL HENTAI 変態 POSTER (Shoji) 30″ X 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL NEWPORT NAUTICALS POSTER (Shore) 30″ X 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL COMPOSITION POSTER (Composition in gray and black) 30″ X 40″ 

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BOB KESSEL MENKO めんこ POSTER (Menko SciFi) 30″ X 40″ 

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cityscapes queensblvd poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL CITYSCAPES POSTER (Queens Blvd)  30″ x 40″  

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pool poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL POOL POSTER (Dive)  30″ x 40″  

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ecce homo poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL ECCE HOMO (Wie man wird, was man ist) POSTER  30″ x 40″ 

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enlightenment poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL ENLIGHTENMENT (Buddha Brushstroke) POSTER  30″ x 40″

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chinese philosophers poster by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL CHINESE PHILOSOPHERS (Confucius) POSTER  30″ x 40″

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REMBRANDT POSTER BY BOBKESSEL

BOB KESSEL REMBRANDT POSTER (Big Hat)  30″ x 40″ 

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art history poster (little cock and big ass) by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL ART HISTORY POSTER (Little Cock and Big Ass)  30″ x 40″

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gauguin poster (Bonjour Monsieur Gauguin) by bobkessel

BOB KESSEL GAUGUIN POSTER (Bonjour Monsieur Gauguin)  30″ x 40″ 

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Bob Kessel Biography
Jun 9th, 2012 by admin

bob_kessel-and-2square-chair

 

Bob Kessel was born 1954 in New York City.

He graduated from the State University of New York with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree.
While in college, he studied Taekwondo (태권도; 跆拳道), a Korean martial art and the national sport of South Korea.

After college, Kessel moved to San Francisco where he studied Aikido (合気道 Aikidō), a Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba. Aikido is performed by blending with the motion of the attacker and redirecting the force of the attack rather than opposing it head-on. This requires very little physical strength, as the aikido practitioner “leads” the attacker’s momentum using entering and turning movements. The techniques are completed with various throws or joint locks.

 

 

In San Francisco, Kessel met and married Yoshiko Uchiyama, a Japanese national visiting America.

 

Kessel continued his studies by moving to Tokyo, Japan to study directly under Tohei at the world headquarters of Aikido, Ki no Kenkyūkai (気の研究会), an aikido organization founded by Koichi Tohei, a disciple of Ueshiba. The official Japanese name of the organization is Shin Shin Toitsu Aikido Kai (心身統一合気道会).

While in Japan, Kessel also studied Ōmori-ryū (大森流) school of iaijutsu at the Nippon Budokan ((日本武道館). Iaijutsu, the art of drawing the sword, is one of the Japanese martial disciplines in the education of the classical warrior.

Kessel and his wife moved back to New York City. He worked as an Art Director, Graphic Designer and Illustrator for New York City advertising agencies for over 20 years on these accounts;

Volvo, Nikon, Maxell, Perdue Chickens, Hertz, Sharp Electronics, Hebrew National, Maxell, Swarovski, Savvy, Rally’s, AT&T, Delta Airlines, JC Penny, SAP, AGFA, IBM, Gevalia Coffee, American Express, Tribeca Film Festival, National Tire, JVC Jazz Festival, Stolichnaya, Heineken, Rheingold, US Open Tennis, Pfizer, Starwood Hotels, Mastercard, Ingersoll-Rand, Gateway Computers, Sears, Altec Lansing, AGFA, Blue Cross/Blue Shield

 

Kessel illustrations used in advertising campaigns:
Tribeca Film Festival, IBM, Gevalia Coffee, American Express, National Tire, JVC Jazz Festival, Stolichnaya, Rheingold Beer, US Open Tennis, Pfizer, Starwood Hotels, Mastercard, Ingersoll-Rand, Gateway Computers, Sears, Altec Lansing, AGFA, Blue Cross/Blue Shield

 

Throughout his career, Kessel has worked on high profile projects for a variety of clients. Since 2000, he has run his own agency in Connecticut with smaller regional clients in CT, RI, MA, NY. He brings the same creative thinking and attention to detail to clients whatever their size. Some of his clients include;

Mystic Seaport Museum, Mystic Aquarium, Providence Picture Frame, ABCO HVACR Supply + Solutions, K9 Contain & Train, AV3, Jessie’s Roadhouse, Ames Builders, Burris Logistics, InterCity Testing, USTA, World Champion Taekwondo, Boat Stuff, Squeaky Kleen, Chin Group, Boston Women’s Journal, Newport Art Museum, Bauhaus Press, Seamen’s Inne, Mystic Indoor Tennis, Greenwich Japanese School, Flat Hammock Press, Ocean Classroom, Vusi Filmworks, Kokopelli Cafe, Weir Farm Trust, Slater Art Museum, Concerts Unlimited, Yankee Retail

 

Kessel is a nationally known illustrator. His work appears in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, BusinessWeek, Texas Monthly, Tokyo Journal, Japan Times, Berkeley Monthly, San Francisco Metro Magazine, Boulevards Magazine, Boston Globe, Hartford Courant, Milken Review

 

Kessel gives back to the community with free posters for non-profit groups like The Martin Luther King Center, Make-A-Wish Foundation, The Greenwich Street Theatre, Juvenile Diabetes Foundation and AIDS walk NYC, Haiti Relief.

Kessel has exhibited his Fine Art at:
Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art in New York City, NY • Museum of Yachting in Newport, RI. • The Hoxie Gallery in Westerly, RI • Mystic Seaport Museum in Mystic, CT • Housatonic Museum of Art in Bridgeport, CT • Stony Creek Gallery in Stony Creek, CT • City Lights Gallery in Bridgeport, CT • Dryden Gallery in Providence, RI • Greenwich Workshop Galley in Fairfield, CT • Flinn Gallery in Greenwich, CT • The Greenwich Japanese School Gallery in Greenwich, CT

 

Bob Kessel has been married for over 30 years and has two children, a son, Ken, and a daughter, Kay.

 

 

 

“The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary
so that the necessary may speak.”

– Hans Hofmann

 

This remark provides a clue to an aspect of Bob Kessel’s work that his apparent iconoclasm and irreverence have tended to conceal. He has remained in an important way a classical artist.

Along with the images of Shunga and Sailboats and Pulp magazines, there has been an abiding commitment to composition, which is the whole point of Western art.

The language of form is what guides him to what lies behind his trivialized subjects, whether they come from pop culture or the history of art.

What makes it conventional is in part the concern for composition. It really gets to be a formal involvement. There is a natural sense of position, analagous to a sense of time in music- and things look right or wrong, in this purely formal way, not related to the subject. You have to make that work. Most of the effort in Bob Kessel’s art is to adjust to this sense of spatial order.

Bob Kessel’s art can be enjoyed on a number of levels, not the least as pure eye candy indulgence. But it also forces those who would dismiss his technique as lazy, pop-induced ephemera to reconsider the amount of decision-making that went into his art.

Like all great artists, he used what was around him for inspiration, commentary, and, in Kessel’s case, a healthy amount of deconstructionist verve and wit.

In that regard, he isn’t so different from generations of jazz players who have used musical quotation as part of the improvisational process — take away the quote and there’s a lot less to talk about all of a sudden.

Kessel’s development as a mature painter was marked by his propensity for working in successive series or thematic groups. The later groups tended to be interpretations and to some extent parodies of earlier Modernist styles – Cubism, Futurism and Expressionism.

“All my art is in some way about other art, even if the other art is cartoons”, Kessel once said — and he was right. All his art is about art, not really about life, which makes it all the more important to have some sense of what he knows about art — what he likes, what he knows, what influenced him.

The basic joke, though, stands firm. Kessel works patiently through a lot of more or less obvious art-historical references — Monet, Picasso, Cezanne, Van Gogh, Klimt, — rendering each of them in some amusingly jarring, art-type way.

Kessel’s own obsession begins to show through. He is, it appears, completely obsessed — again, to a strangely post-modern degree — with the arbitrariness of the conventions through which Western Art renders a three-dimensional world of experience onto a two-dimensional surface of optical perception.

And of course he’s right — this code is, indeed, arbitrary and strange. An instance of this whole issue of codified visual language seems to have revolved around the way in which a square, say, with a couple of diagonal lines across it instantly signals to us a nude, despite the fact that it does not look much like a nude and has none of the actual qualities of a nude, such as depth and volume.

So many contemporary artists seem to congratulate themselves on believing in nothing (whereas, of course, the whole fact that they consider nihilism as preferable to the alternative frantically signals a whole host of beliefs, some very hoary indeed, under which these same artists are labouring) it comes as a pleasant surprise to see, there with the self-deprecating humour, something very like a belief in the ability of art to help people understand their world — one tiny aspect of it, anyway.

But then it has to be said that Bob Kessel also comes across, very clearly, as an extremely pleasant, likeable, humane sort of person, never taking himself too seriously, and always experimenting, trying to grow, even when he might have been best advised to keep hoeing the same productive furrow.

 

“There is a beautifully visceral quality to Bob Kessel’s artwork that forces one to experience it. Hands, faces, lips, legs burst out from a fractured windowpane of colors and lines, like a Maserati crashing through a fashion show. Evocative, absurd, and witty.”

– Michael Diederich

“Bob Kessel’s work is spectacular, beautiful and even erotic through his use of line and color. He even manages to evoke humor out of deceptively simple forms.”

– Michael Gross

“We unfortunately live in an era when too many things are called art and too many people without an idea in their heads are called artists. Bob Kessel goes against that particular grain. His work crystallizes the very concept of art. He distills all of the important elements of modernism in service to an elegant idea of what visual art should be at this point in time. In short, it’s good stuff. The man’s an artist.”

– John Maleki

“Bob Kessel is a thrilling artist — delicate and dynamic at the same time. His pictures often have a perfection that makes one proud to be human.”

– Mark O-Donnell

“Mr. Kessel’s artwork is a truly original vision. It evokes a unique modernistic quality that is not cliche. It has a bold fresh quality to it. Bravo!”

– Joe Cupani

“Bob Kessel has a style that’s so unique he can interpret famous classic art, and call it his own. I am so fortunate to have one of his earlier works hanging in my living room.”

– Dean Stefanides

“Bob Kessel has a bold, fresh, vision with a talent for distilling a concept or perspective down to it’s simplest truth. He can do this in a way that also reveals a wry wit and intelligence.”

– Bob Cesiro

“Bob, I have to tell you how impressed I am with you. Unfortunately these days it can be so easy to become cynical and burnt out. Yet you seem to be always evolving, growing and pushing foward! You have a very impressive body of beautiful work. Very inspiring. Its nice to be able to say that I still know a true artist.”

– Frank Guzzone

“Bob Kessel is an incredible artist. His vast portfolio of art that he has created is astonishing. He is one of today’s living, breathing modern artists. Go to his website to be amazed.”

– Angelo Juliano

I can easy sum up Bob’s fantastic body of work in one word. “INSPIRING”. Bob work keeps getting better and better. I’m very moved by his creative commitment. “Where on earth does he find the time”!

– Sidney Zanzani-Barrier

“Bob Kessel is one of those rare artists whose work exquisitely combines both imagination and craft. “

– Brian Belefant

“Bob Kessel is a marvelous artist with a unique vision. Two of his works hang proudly in our studio”

– Eric Kaye, The Lodge

“Bob Kessel’s ever-evolving body of work represents the beautiful process of raw talent combined with intellect and wit. From small, whimsical scenes of intimate everyday life, to his glorious abstractions and deeply individual reinterpretations, one never fails to be struck by the loveliness and power of Mr. Kessel’s art.”

– Michele Cone

“Bob Kessel is a savvy artist who will play with any idea. He will stretch and mold it to its brink, until it has taken on a whole new perspective. Not only does he make these sometimes overlooked aspects beautiful but reveals an edgier, better side to them”

– Ariane Chang

“Bob Kessel’s art always inspires me, I love the enticing use of color, and the variety of themes and concepts. It is art with wit and energy that says something. In a world of bland, mass-produced everything, I always look forward to the new collections that Bob Kessel creates – – not only things of beauty but incredible art with impact, imagination and a unique approach.”

– Jacqueline Smith

“What I really like about Bob Kessel’s art is that I continually get to learn more about other artists when I look at his work. His versions of the great masters works are fascinating! And while I started life as a lover of realism in paintings – I’ve been converted by the content of Bob’s abstract pieces. I still love the pieces that include one of his paintings inside paintings the best!”

– Marty Hubbard

“The Bob Kessel Art History series is strong and arresting whether or not the viewer ‘gets’ the art historical references, and the scale transforms the inspirational sources once again, and dramatically.”

– Roberta Waddell

“I am always in awe of and inspired by the quality and quantity of Bob Kessel’s amazing body of work.
His expression is a fresh and unique approach with a distinct style and energy.
It is a delight to visit his website again and again to see where his journey has taken him next.”

– Maria Scrivan

“Bob Kessel is one of the hardest working artists around. And he’s always up for a challenge. Bob is at the top of my list of freelance illustrators I can count on, no matter the situation. His Roger Federer portrait for The Times’ U.S. Open tennis section is a classic. “

– Wayne Kamidoi, AD for sports/NY Times.

WASHINGTON AND LINCOLN by Bob Kessel
Feb 19th, 2012 by admin

washington-lincoln-gray-bob-kessel

WASHINGTON AND LINCOLN by Bob Kessel

Presidents’ Day or George Washington’s Birthday, is a United States federal holiday celebrated on the third Monday of February.
To celebrate, I am posting the print WASHINGTON AND LINCOLN and its variations from the Bob Kessel art series AMERICAN ICONS.

Bob Kessel’s art series “AMERICAN ICONS” features pictures of American presidents and historical figures like “WASHINGTON AND LINCOLN” shown above.
These pictures are available as signed and numbered limited edition fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for pricing and availability.

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wahington-lincoln-green-bob-kessel

WASHINGTON AND LINCOLN  (GREEN LINE) by Bob Kessel

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washington-lincoln-red-bob-kessel

WASHINGTON AND LINCOLN  (RED LINE) by Bob Kessel

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washington-lincoln-blue-bob-kessel

WASHINGTON AND LINCOLN  (BLUE LINE) by Bob Kessel

PAUL GAUGUIN by Bob Kessel
Jun 1st, 2011 by admin

TAHITIANS APRES GAUGUIN by Bob Kessel

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VAN GOGH BY GAUGUIN by Bob Kessel

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gauguin-bob-kessel-410

ET L’OR DE LEUR CORPS by Bob Kessel after Gauguin

“I close my eyes so I can see.”
– Paul Gauguin

Bob Kessel has created an art series based on Paul Gauguin.
The “GAUGUIN” series can be purchased as signed and numbered limited edition fine art prints and originals. Contact Bob Kessel for prices and availability.

Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin, born June 7,  1848 was a leading Post-Impressionist painter. His bold experimentation with coloring led directly to the Synthetist style of modern art while his expression of the inherent meaning of the subjects in his paintings, under the influence of the cloisonnist style, paved the way to Primitivism and the return to the pastoral. He was also an influential proponent of wood engraving and woodcuts as art forms.

Like his friend Vincent Van Gogh, with whom in 1888 he spent nine weeks painting in Arles, Paul Gauguin experienced bouts of depression and at one time attempted suicide. Disappointed with Impressionism, he felt that traditional European painting had become too imitative and lacked symbolic depth. By contrast, the art of Africa and Asia seemed to him full of mystic symbolism and vigour. There was a vogue in Europe at the time for the art of other cultures, especially that of Japan (Japonism).

Japonism, or Japonisme, the original French term, which is also used in English, is a term for the influence of the arts of Japan on those of the West. The word was first used by Jules Claretie in his book L’Art Francais en 1872 published in that year. Works arising from the direct transfer of principles of Japanese art on Western, especially by French artists, are called japonesque.

From the 1860s, ukiyo-e, Japanese wood-block prints, became a source of inspiration for many European impressionist painters in France and the rest of the West, and eventually for Art Nouveau and Cubism. Artists were especially affected by the lack of perspective and shadow, the flat areas of strong colour, the compositional freedom in placing the subject off-centre, with mostly low diagonal axes to the background.

Under the influence of folk art and Japanese prints, Gauguin evolved towards Cloisonnism, a style given its name by the critic Édouard Dujardin in response to Emile Bernard’s cloisonne enamelling technique. Gauguin was very appreciative of Bernard’s art and of his daring with the employment of a style which suited Gauguin in his quest to express the essence of the objects in his art. In The Yellow Christ (1889), often cited as a quintessential Cloisonnist work, the image was reduced to areas of pure colour separated by heavy black outlines. In such works Gauguin paid little attention to classical perspective and boldly eliminated subtle gradations of colour, thereby dispensing with the two most characteristic principles of post-Renaissance painting. His painting later evolved towards Synthetism in which neither form nor colour predominate but each has an equal role.

In 1891, Gauguin, frustrated by lack of recognition at home and financially destitute, sailed to the tropics to escape European civilization and “everything that is artificial and conventional.” (Before this he had made several attempts to find a tropical paradise where he could ‘live on fish and fruit’ and paint in his increasingly primitive style, including short stays in Martinique and as a labourer on the Panama Canal construction, however he was dismissed from his job after only two weeks). Living in Mataiea Village in Tahiti, he painted “Fatata te Miti” (“By the Sea”), “Ia Orana Maria” (Ave Maria) and other depictions of Tahitian life. He moved to Punaauia in 1897, where he created the masterpiece painting “Where Do We Come From” and then lived the rest of his life in the Marquesas Islands, returning to France only once, when he painted at Pont-Aven. His works of that period are full of quasi-religious symbolism and an exoticized view of the inhabitants of Polynesia. In Polynesia he sided with the native peoples, clashing often with the colonial authorities and with the Catholic Church. During this period he also wrote the book Avant et après (before and after), a fragmented collection of observations about life in Polynesia, memories from his life and comments on literature and paintings. In 1903, due to a problem with the church and the government, he was sentenced to three months in prison, and charged a fine. At that time he was being supported by the art dealer Ambroise Vollard. He died of syphilis before he could start the prison sentence. His body had been weakened by alcohol and a dissipated life. He was 54 years old.

RAOUL DUFY by Bob Kessel
May 28th, 2011 by admin

APPLE POWERBOOK AFTER DUFY by Bob Kessel

 

“Nature, my dear sir, is only a hypothesis.”
– Raoul Dufy

 

 

Raoul Dufy, born June 3, 1877 was a French Fauvist painter. Bob Kessel has created a new art series titled “2 SQUARES” featuring featuring pictures like APPLE POWERBOOK (shown above) based on a painting by Raoul Dufy. These pictures are available as signed and numbered limited edition fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for pricing and availability.

MATISSE GOLDFISH by Bob Kessel
Sep 9th, 2010 by admin

The Museum of Modern Art in New York City has a new exhibition, Matisse: Radical Invention, 1913–1917.

In the time between Henri Matisse’s (1869–1954) return from Morocco in 1913 and his departure for Nice in 1917, the artist produced some of the most demanding, experimental, and enigmatic works of his career—paintings that are abstracted and rigorously purged of descriptive detail, geometric and sharply composed, and dominated by shades of black and gray. Works from this period have typically been treated as unrelated to one another, as an aberration within the artist’s development, or as a response to Cubism or World War I.

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MATISSE GOLDFISH by Bob Kessel

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Bob Kessel has created an art series titled, “Something Fishy”. It features pictures based on the works of Henri Matisse like the picture “MATISSE GOLDFISH” shown above. These pictures are available as signed and numbered limited edition fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for pricing and availability.

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GOLDFISH BOWL by Bob Kessel

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FUTURISMO MATISSE GOLDFISH by Bob Kessel

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Two poster set placed side by side combines to make one large picture. Bob Kessel art inspired by the work of Henri Matisse.

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Kay with half of SOMETHING FISHY poster, which side by side create one large image.

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Bob Kessel has created an art series titled, “Something Fishy”.
It features pictures based on the works of Henri Matisse like the picture “MATISSE GOLDFISH” shown below.
These pictures are available as signed and numbered limited edition original fine art prints.
Contact Bob Kessel for pricing and availability.

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FISH RED STUDIO by Bob Kessel

Henri Matisse, born in 1869, is regarded as one of the great formative figures in 20th-century art, as well as the leader of the Fauve group. Fauvism is defined as an early-20th-century movement in painting begun by a group of French artists and marked by the use of bold, often distorted forms and vivid colors. Matisse was associated with this group due to his use of vivid colors, as well as his unusual style of presenting objects. Many critics at this time called him, as well as other artists with similar styles, a disgrace for art and therefore called them ‘The Fauves’. The Fauves means ‘Wild Beasts’, a name that the artists of the group accepted with pride. The main goals of the artists in this movement were to break away from the rigid Impressionist movement, and begin using bolder colors, as well as their own interpretations of shapes. The work of Matisse is based on the principals and possibilities of ‘leaving out’. The human mind can fill in what is missing in the painting, like dimension, details and plastical forms. The Fauves expressed their feelings of joy for life and joy for art and painting. Fauvism paved the way for future styles of art, and was considered radical in the early 20th century.

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MATISSE AND HIS MODEL by Bob Kessel

See more Matisse inspired art by Bob Kessel by clicking here.

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