ERNST LUDWIG KIRCHNER by Bob Kessel

All true artists, whether they know it or not, create from a place of no-mind, from inner stillness.

– Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

 

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SELF PORTRAIT WITH MODEL by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

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ARTIST WITH MODEL by Bob Kessel

Born May 6, 1880, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner studied architecture and painting before forming the artists’ group Die Brücke (“The Bridge”) in Dresden on 7 June 1905, with Fritz Bleyl, Erich Heckel, and Karl Schmidt-Rottluff. Kirchner moved to Berlin in 1911, and within two years the group split.

Kirchner worked at a feverish pace, producing art that drew its subject matter from his studio life with artist friends and models, the street and nightclub life of the city, and summer trips to beaches. His works were exhibited and collected from 1905, and by the mid-teens Kirchner had a number of devoted collectors, both private and institutional.

At the outbreak of World War I in 1914, Kirchner joined the German army, but eventually suffered a nervous breakdown. Despite ill health and struggles to recover, he continued to produce major paintings, prints, drawings and sculpture. In 1917 he moved to Davos, Switzerland, and began to include in his work images of rural life and the surrounding Alps. Through the 1920s major exhibitions of his work were held in Berlin, Frankfurt, Dresden, and other cities. In 1931 he was made a member of the Prussian Academy.

Labeled a degenerate artist by the Nazis, Kirchner was asked to resign from the Berlin Academy of Arts in 1933. In 1937, more than 600 of his works were confiscated from German museums and were either destroyed or sold, many ending up in America. In 1938 the psychological suffering caused by the Nazi authorities rejecting him as “un-German,” the dispersal and destruction of his works, and the Nazi occupation of Austria so close to his home in Davos led to Kirchner’s suicide.

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BERLIN FRAU  print by Bob Kessel exhibited at gallery show

Bob Kessel has created an art series based on the works of Ernst Ludwig Kirchner like in the print shown below titled, “BERLIN FRAU”. They are available as signed and numbered limited edition fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for pricing and availability.

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BERLIN FRAU by Bob Kessel

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GREEN GIRL by Bob Kessel

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FRANZI by Bob Kessel

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BARE BACK by Bob Kessel

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BRUCKE MADCHEN by Bob Kessel

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ZWEI NACKTEN FRAUEN by Bob Kessel

 

 

BRUCKE MADCHEN

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BRUCKE MADCHEN by Bob Kessel

“BRUCKE MADCHEN” by Bob Kessel,  is based on the works of Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and the other Die Brücke artists known for their woodblock prints. It can be purchased as a signed and numbered limited edition original fine art print. Contact Bob Kessel for prices and availability.

2 NUDES by Bob Kessel

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2 NUDES by Bob Kessel

“2 NUDES” by Bob Kessel, based on the works of Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and the Die Brucke artists, can be purchased as a signed and numbered limited edition original fine art print. Contact Bob Kessel for prices and availability.

DIAMOND RED NUDES by Bob Kessel

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DIAMOND RED NUDES by Bob Kessel

“DIAMOND RED NUDES” by Bob Kessel, based on the works of Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and the Die Brucke artists, can be purchased as a signed and numbered limited edition original fine art print. Contact Bob Kessel for prices and availability.

OTTO DIX by Bob Kessel

All art is exorcism. I paint dreams and visions too; the dreams and visions of my time. Painting is the effort to produce order; order in yourself. There is much chaos in me, much chaos in our time.

– Otto Dix

“ART HISTORY” is an art series by Bob Kessel featuring pictures based on famous artist’s paintings throughout history like the OTTO DIX inspired print “DAME MITT REIHER” shown below. These pictures are available as signed and numbered limited edition fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for pricing and availability.

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DAME MITT REIHER by bob Kessel

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Wilhelm Heinrich Otto Dix (1891 – 1969) was a German painter and printmaker. Noted for his ruthless and harshly realistic depictions of Weimar society and of the brutality of war, he, along with George Grosz, is widely considered one of the most important artists of the Neue Sachlichkeit.

Dix was a contributor to the Neue Sachlichkeit exhibition in Mannheim in 1925, which featured works by George Grosz, Max Beckmann, Heinrich Maria Davringhausen, Karl Hubbuch, Rudolf Schlichter, Georg Scholz and many others. Dix’s work, like that of Grosz—his friend and fellow veteran—was extremely critical of contemporary German society and often dwelled on the act of Lustmord, or sexual murder. He drew attention to the bleaker side of life, unsparingly depicting prostitution, violence, old age and death.

Among his most famous paintings are the triptych Metropolis (1928), a scornful portrayal of depraved actions of Germany’s Weimar Republic, where nonstop revelry was a way to deal with the wartime defeat and financial catastrophe, and the startling Portrait of the Journalist Sylvia von Harden (1926). His depictions of legless and disfigured veterans—a common sight on Berlin’s streets in the 1920s—unveil the ugly side of war and illustrate their forgotten status within contemporary German society, a concept also developed in Erich Maria Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front.

When the Nazis came to power in Germany, they regarded Dix as a degenerate artist and had him sacked from his post as an art teacher at the Dresden Academy. He later moved to Lake Constance. Dix’s paintings The Trench and War cripples were exhibited in the state-sponsored Munich 1937 exhibition of degenerate art, Entartete Kunst. They were later burned.

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DAME MITT REIHER by Otto Dix