SIDEBAR
»
S
I
D
E
B
A
R
«
KNEE DEEP IN POUSSIN by Bob Kessel
Jul 30th, 2010 by admin

mythology-nymph-satyr-bob-kessel

NYMPH AND SATYR by Bob Kessel apres Poussin

_

poussin-venus-spied-upon

NYMPH AND SATYR by Nicolas Poussin

_

Bob Kessel has created an art series titled, “MYTHOLOGY”. It features pictures based on the works of famous artists throughout history like the picture “NYMPH AND SATYR” originally by Poussin, shown above. These pictures are available as signed and numbered limited edition fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for pricing and availability.

_

Nicolas Poussin (1594 – 1665) was a French painter in the classical style. His work serves as an alternative to the dominant Baroque style of the 17th century.

Initially, Poussin’s genius was recognized only by small circles of collectors. (In the two decades following his death, a particularly large collection of his works was amassed by Louis XIV.) At the same time, it was recognized that he had contributed a new theme of “classical severity” to French art.

Benjamin West, an American painter of the 18th century who worked in Britain, based his canvas of the death of General Wolfe at Quebec on Poussin’s example. As a result, the image is one in which each character gazes with appropriate seriousness on Wolfe’s death after securing British domination of North America.

Jacques-Louis David resurrected a style already known as “Poussinesque” during the French Revolution in part because the leaders of the Revolution looked to replace the frivolity and oppression of the court with Republican severity and civic-mindedness, most obvious in David’s dramatic canvas of Brutus receiving the bodies of his sons, sacrificed to his own principles, and the famous death of Marat.

Throughout the 19th century, Poussin, available to the ordinary person’s gaze because the Revolution had opened the collections of the Louvre, was inspirational for thoughtful and self-reflexive artists who pondered their own work methods, notably Cézanne, who strove to “recreate Poussin after nature”, and the Post-Impressionists. The less thoughtful enjoyed the eroticism of some of Poussin’s classicizing subjects.

In the twentieth century art critics have suggested that the “analytic Cubist” experiments of Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque were founded upon Poussin’s example.

The most famous 20th-century scholar of Poussin was the Englishman Anthony Blunt, Keeper of the Queen’s Pictures, who in 1979 was disgraced by revelations of his complicity with Soviet intelligence.

Today, Poussin’s paintings at the Louvre reside in a gallery dedicated to him.

DIAMOND MONET’S HAYSTACKS by BobKessel
Jul 28th, 2010 by admin

“For me, a landscape does not exist in its own right,
since its appearance changes at every moment;
but the surrounding atmosphere brings it to life–
the light and the air which vary continually.”

- Claude Monet

diamond-haystack-blue-bob-kessel

DIAMOND HAYSTACK (blue) by Bob Kessel

_

diamond-haystack-green-bob-kessel

DIAMOND HAYSTACK (green) by Bob Kessel

_

diamond-monets-haystack-bob-kessel

MONET’S HAYSTACK by Bob Kessel

_

diamond-monet-haystacks-two-bob-kessel

MONET’S HAYSTACKS TWO by Bob Kessel

_

diamond-monets-haystacks-bob-kessel

MONET’S HAYSTACKS by Bob Kessel

_

diamond-big-haystack-bob-kessel

MONET’S HAYSTACK BIG by Bob Kessel

_

diamond-monet-haystack-shadow-bob-kessel

MONET’S HAYSTACK SHADOW by Bob Kessel

_

diamond-monet-haystack-pink-bob-kessel

MONET’S HAYSTACK PINK by Bob Kessel

_

diamond-2-monet-haystacks-bob-kessel

2 MONET HAYSTACKS by Bob Kessel

_

meules-wall-bob-kessel

MEULES paintings by Bob Kessel after Claude Monet

_

From TWO FOR THE MONET art series by Bob Kessel

_

meules-monet-bob-kessel

MEULES by Bob Kessel

monet-hay-in-field-bob-kessel

HAY IN FIELD by Bob Kessel

haystack-monet-bob-kessel

HAYSTACK by Bob Kessel

brush-stacks-monet-bob-kessel

BRUSH STACKS by Bob Kessel

grainstacks-a-monet-bob-kessel

GRAINSTACKS A by Bob Kessel

grainstacks-b-monet-bob-kessel

GRAINSTACKS B by Bob Kessel

grainstacks-c-monet-bob-kessel

GRAINSTACKS C by Bob Kessel

“MONET’S HAYSTACKS” art series by Bob Kessel, can be purchased as a signed and numbered limited edition original fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for prices and availability.

Haystacks is the title of a series of impressionist paintings by Claude Monet. The primary subjects of all of the paintings in the series are stacks of hay that have been stacked in the field after the harvest season. The title refers primarily to a twenty-five canvas series begun the autumn of 1890 and continued through the following spring, using that year’s harvest. Some use a broader definition of the title to refer to other paintings by Monet with this same theme. The series is known for its thematic use of repetition to show differences in perception of light across various times of day, seasons, and types of weather. The subjects were painted in fields near Monet’s home in Giverny, France.

The series is among Monet’s most notable works. Although the largest collections of Monet’s work are held in Paris at the Musée d’Orsay and Musée Marmottan Monet, Boston, Massachusetts at the Museum of Fine Arts, New York City at the Metropolitan Museum and Museum of Modern Art and Tokyo at the National Museum of Western Art, six of the twenty-five haystacks pieces are currently housed at the Art Institute of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois, United States The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts, United States holds two, and The Louvre in Paris, France holds one. Other museums that hold parts of this series in their collection include the Hill-Stead Museum in Farmington, Connecticut (which also has one of five from the earlier 1888-9 harvest), National Gallery of Scotland in Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom, Minneapolis Institute of Arts in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States, Kunsthaus Zürich in Zürich, Switzerland, and Shelburne Museum, Shelburne, Vermont, United States.

Monet settled in Giverny in 1883. Most of his paintings from 1883 until his death 40 years later were of scenes within 2 miles of his home. Indeed, the haystacks themselves were situated just outside his door. He was intensely aware of and fascinated by the visual nuances of the region’s landscape and the variation in the seasons.

Monet had already painted the same subject in different moods. However, as he matured as a painter, his depictions of atmospheric influences were increasingly concerned not only with specific effects, but with overall color harmonies that allowed for an autonomous use of rich color. The conventional wisdom was that the compact, solid haystacks were both a simple subject and an unimaginative one. However, contemporary writers and friends of the artist noted that Monet’s subject matter was always carefully chosen, the product of careful thought and analysis. Monet undertook a study of capturing their vibrance under direct light, and juxtaposing the same subject from the same view in more muted atmospheric conditions. It was not unusual for Monet to alter the canvases back in his studio, in search of harmonious transitions within the series.

The Haystacks series was a financial success. Fifteen of these were exhibited by Durand-Ruel in May 1891, and every painting sold within days. The exhibit met with great public acclaim. Octave Mirbeau described Monet’s daring series as representing “what lies beyond progress itself.” Others described the grainstacks as “faces of the landscape,” and viewers seemed to take assurance that the series would help preserve rural traditions despite industrialization and urbanization. They represented the countryside as a retreat from daily problems and home for contentment with nature. Camille Pissarro said “These canvases breathe contentment.” Most of the paintings sold immediately for as much as 1,000 francs. Additionally, Monet’s prices in general began to rise steeply. As a result, he was able to buy outright the house and grounds at Giverny and to start constructing a waterlily pond. After years of mere subsistence living he was able to enjoy success.

BULL! by Bob Kessel
Jul 20th, 2010 by admin

bull-bob-kessel

BULL! by Bob Kessel

Bob Kessel has created a new print titled, “BULL!” based on the works of Pablo Picasso. The picture is available as limited edition fine art print, signed and numbered by the artist. Contact Bob Kessel for prices and availability.

Pablo Picasso created ‘Bull’ in 1945. ‘Bull’ is a suite of lithographs that have become a master class in how to develop an artwork from the academic to the abstract. In this series of images, Picasso starts with a classical rendering of a bull. Then in a series of progressive steps, reduces it to pure abstraction.

Bob Kessel takes a slightly different tack, placing the different levels of abstraction in the same picture. A Picasso linoleum block print style bull looks at his Mondrianesque abstracted image in an oval mirror.

BULL by Picasso

picassobull8

Roy Lichtenstein tried his hand at this exercise
in this six step series.

bullseries

KLIMT VERKLEMPT by Bob Kessel
Jul 14th, 2010 by admin

typew300_kessel_klimt

Bob Kessel’s art series “KLIMT VERKLEMPT” is based on the works of Gustav Klimt. These pictures and many others, can be purchased as signed and numbered limited edition original fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for prices and availability.

Klimt wrote little about his vision or his methods. He kept no diary. In a rare writing called “Commentary on a non-existent self-portrait”, he wrote,

“I have never painted a self-portrait. I am less interested in myself as a subject for a painting than I am in other people, above all women…There is nothing special about me. I am a painter who paints day after day from morning to night…Who ever wants to know something about me… ought to look carefully at my pictures.”

- Gustav Klimt

klimt-klimtomaniac-bob-kessel

KLIMTOMANIAC by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-klimtfrau-bob-kessel

KLIMTFRAU by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-watersnakes-bob-kessel

WATERSNAKES by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-madams-x-bob-kessel

MADAMS X by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-birch-trees-bob-kessel

BIRCH TREES by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-hug-bob-kessel

HUG by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-aida-bob-kessel

AIDA by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

thigh-high-bob-kessel

THIGH HIGH by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

thigh-sigh-bob-kessel

THIGH SIGH by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-embrace-bob-kessel

EMBRACE by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-milch-bob-kessel

MILCH by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-lap-bob-kessel

LAP by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-hummer-bob-kessel

HUMMER by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-2girls-bob-kessel

TWO GIRLS by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-to-my-critics-bob-kessel
TO MY CRITICS by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-kneel-bob-kessel

KNEEL by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-wrap-bob-kessel

WRAPPED by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-mother-and-child-bob-kessel

MOTHER AND CHILD (WITH STEALTH) by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-danae-bob-kessel

DANAE by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

klimt-fur-hat-bob-kessel

FUR HAT by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

diamond-klimt-kiss-bob-kessel

DIAMOND KISS by Bob Kessel
after Gustav Klimt

»  Substance:WordPress   »  Style:Ahren Ahimsa