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YURI HENTAI by Bob Kessel
Jun 30th, 2010 by admin

Yuri (百合), also known by the wasei-eigo construction Girls Love (ガールズラブ guruzu rabu), is a Japanese jargon term for content and a genre involving love between women in manga, anime, and related Japanese media. Yuri can focus either on the sexual or the emotional aspects of the relationship, the latter sometimes being called shojo-ai by western fans.

Etymology

The word yuri (百合) literally means “lily”, and is a relatively common Japanese feminine name. In 1976, Itō Bungaku, editor of Barazoku (薔薇族, lit. rose tribe), a magazine geared primarily towards gay men, first used the term yurizoku (百合族, lit. lily tribe) in reference to female readers in the title of a column of letters called Yurizoku no heya (百合族の部屋, lit. lily tribe’s room). It is unclear whether this was the first instance of this usage of the term. Not all women whose letters appeared in this short-lived column were necessarily lesbians, but some were and gradually an association developed.

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SWAPPIN’ SPIT by Bob Kessel

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YURI HENTAI TWO GIRLS CRUSH by Bob Kessel

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YURI HENTAI ANIME GIRLS by Bob Kessel

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YURI HENTAI GIRLS RABU by Bob Kessel

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YURI HENTAI ANIME GIRLS KISSING by Bob Kessel

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YURI HENTAI FRENCH KISS by Bob Kessel

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YURI HENTAI TONGUE by Bob Kessel

INDEPENDENCE DAY ICONS
Jun 29th, 2010 by admin

Bob Kessel’s art series “AMERICAN ICONS” features pictures of American presidents and historical figures. These pictures are available as signed and numbered limited edition fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for pricing and availability.

Bob Kessel’s American Icons art series also includes many other famous people including Marilyn Monroe, Miles Davis, Charles Bukowski, Muhammad Ali, Elvis Presley, Marlon Brando, John F Kennedy, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and many more.

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WASHINGTON AND LINCOLN by Bob Kessel

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WASHINGTON AND LINCOLN  (GREEN LINE) by Bob Kessel

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WASHINGTON AND LINCOLN  (RED LINE) by Bob Kessel

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WASHINGTON AND LINCOLN  (BLUE LINE) by Bob Kessel

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THOMAS JEFFERSON AT MONTICELLO by Bob Kessel

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BENJAMIN FRANKLIN AND THE LIBERTY BELL by Bob Kessel

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LADY LIBERTY AND AMERICAN EAGLE by Bob Kessel

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INDIAN HEAD AND BUFFALO by Bob Kessel

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INDIANHEAD AND BUFFALO  (PURPLE LINE) by Bob Kessel

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JFK: PROFILES IN CHIAROSCURO by Bob Kessel

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BALLET DANCERS by Bob Kessel
Jun 27th, 2010 by admin

Bob Kessel has a new art series based on Degas ballet dancers drawings.

Certain features of Degas’s work remained the same throughout his life. The figure remained his primary subject. It was not unusual for him to repeat a subject many times, varying the composition or treatment. He was a deliberative artist whose works were prepared, calculated, practiced, developed in stages. They were made up of parts. The adjustment of each part to the whole, their linear arrangement, was the occasion for infinite reflection and experiment. Degas himself explained, “In art, nothing should look like chance, not even movement”.

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BALLET DANCERS AT THE BARRE by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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BALLET TWO DANCERS by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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BALLET DANCERS ADJUSTING SLIPPER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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BALLET DANCERS ON ONE LEG by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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BALLET DANCERS TOE TOUCH by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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BALLET DANCERS KNEE by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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BALLET DANCERS FIXING STRAP by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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BALLET DANCERS FAN by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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BALLET DANCERS THREE DANCERS by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS PINK GIRLS by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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BALLET DANCERS AT THE BAR by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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BALLET DANCERS TUTU by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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BALLET DANCERS CRIMSON by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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BALLET DANCERS FOUR DANCERS by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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BALLET DANCERS BARRE by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS APRES LE BAIN by Bob Kessel
Jun 27th, 2010 by admin

Edgar Degas,  1834-1917, was a French artist, acknowledged as the master of drawing the human figure in motion. Degas worked in many mediums, preferring pastel to all others. He is perhaps best known for his paintings, drawings, and bronzes of ballerinas and of race horses.

Degas’ style reflects his deep respect for the old masters (he was an enthusiastic copyist well into middle age) and his great admiration for Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres and Eugène Delacroix. He was also a collector of Japanese prints, whose compositional principles influenced his work.

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ORANGE BATHER ALA DEGAS by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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APRES LE BAIN by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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The art of Degas reflects a concern for the psychology of movement and expression and the harmony of line and continuity of contour. These characteristics set Degas apart from the other impressionist painters, although he took part in all but one of the 8 impressionist exhibitions between 1874 and 1886. Degas was the son of a wealthy banker, and his aristocratic family background instilled into his early art a haughty yet sensitive quality of detachment. As he grew up, his idol was the painter Jean Auguste Ingres, whose example pointed him in the direction of a classical draftsmanship, stressing balance and clarity of outline. After beginning his artistic studies with Louis Lamothes, a pupil of Ingres, he started classes at the Ecole des Beaux Arts but left in 1854 and went to Italy. He stayed there for 5 years, studying Italian art, especially Renaissance works.

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APRES LE TUB by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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As his financial situation improved through sales of his own work, he was able to indulge his passion for collecting works by artists he admired: old masters such as El Greco and such contemporaries as Manet, Pissarro, Cézanne, Gauguin, and Van Gogh. Three artists he idolized, Ingres, Delacroix, and Daumier, were especially well represented in his collection.

For all the stylistic evolution, certain features of Degas’s work remained the same throughout his life. He always painted indoors, preferring to work in his studio, either from memory or using models. The figure remained his primary subject; his few landscapes were produced from memory or imagination. It was not unusual for him to repeat a subject many times, varying the composition or treatment. He was a deliberative artist whose works, as Andrew Forge has written, “were prepared, calculated, practiced, developed in stages. They were made up of parts. The adjustment of each part to the whole, their linear arrangement, was the occasion for infinite reflection and experiment.”Degas himself explained, “In art, nothing should look like chance, not even movement”.

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FEMME APRES LE BAIN by Edgar Degas

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The Dreyfus Affair, which divided Paris from the 1890s to the early 1900s, further intensified his anti-Semitism. By the mid 1890s, he had broken off relations with all of his Jewish friends, publicly disavowed his previous friendships with Jewish artists, and refused to use models who he believed might be Jewish. He remained an outspoken anti-Semite and member of the anti-Semitic “Anti-Dreyfusards” until his death.

His argumentative nature was deplored by Renoir, who said of him: “What a creature he was, that Degas! All his friends had to leave him; I was one of the last to go, but even I couldn’t stay till the end.”

Although he is known to have been working in pastel as late as the end of 1907, and is believed to have continued making sculpture as late as 1910, he apparently ceased working in 1912, when the impending demolition of his longtime residence on the rue Victor Massé forced a wrenching move to quarters on the boulevard de Clichy. He never married and spent the last years of his life, nearly blind, restlessly wandering the streets of Paris before dying in 1917.

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DEGAS BACK BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS BEND BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS SPONGE BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS SOAP BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS WIPE BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS TOWEL BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS TOWELING OFF BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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DEGAS TOWEL WIPE BATHER by Bob Kessel apres Degas

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