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2 FOR THE MONET
Aug 28th, 2009 by admin

meules-wall-bob-kessel

MEULES paintings by Bob Kessel after Claude Monet

“For me, a landscape does not exist in its own right, since its appearance changes at every moment; but the surrounding atmosphere brings it to life—the light and the air which vary continually.”

- Claude Monet

Bob Kessel’s art series “2 FOR THE MONET” features pictures based on Monet’s paintings like in the picture “MEULES” shown above. These pictures are available as signed and numbered limited edition fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for pricing and availability.

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PETITAILLY and POPLARS prints based on the works of Claude Monet by Bob Kessel

In the 1890s, Monet painted groups of huge canvases, some as large as 6 by 14 feet. He painted the same subject from the same angle at different times of day to discover how the changes in the quality of the light would change the shapes, mood and images of the chosen subject. In his journals, Monet recorded his method for working on the haystacks: he took multiple canvases to the field and worked for no longer than ten or fifteen minutes on each painting. As the angle of the sun changed, the colors and shadows changed, and Monet sought to paint exactly what he saw.

Claude Monet painted a series of paintings of the Palace of Westminster, home of the British Parliament, during his stay in London. The paintings have all the same size and viewpoint, Monet’s window at St Thomas’ Hospital overlooking the Thames. They are however painted at different times of the day and at different weather circumstances.

Monet produced numerous Haystack paintings. His earlier landscapes had included haystacks in an ancillary manner. Monet had also produced five paintings with haystacks as the primary subject during the 1888 harvest.

This series is one of Monet’s earliest that relied on thematic repetition to illustrate nuances in perception across natural variation such as times of day, seasons, and types of weather. For Monet, the concept of producing and exhibiting a series of paintings related by subject and vantage point began in 1889, with at least ten paintings done at the Valley of the Creuse, and subsequently shown at the Galerie Georges Petit. This interest in the serial motif would continue for the rest of his career.

Although the mundane subject was constant throughout this series, the underlying theme may be seen as the transience of light. This concept enabled him to use repetition to show nuances of perception as seasons, time of day, and weather changes. The constant subject provided the basis from which comparisons could be made in changes of light across this nuanced series. The first paintings in the series were started in late September or early October 1890, and he continued producing these paintings for about seven months. These paintings made Monet the first painter to paint such a large quantity of pictures of the same subject matter differentiated by light, weather, atmosphere and perspective.

Beginning in the 1880s and 1890s, Monet focused on Haystacks and a number of other subjects (other series included the Mornings on the Seine, Poplars, Rouen Cathedral, the Houses of Parliament, and the Water Lilies, among others).

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PETITAILLY

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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MEULES

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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HAYSTACKS IN FIELD

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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HAYSTACK

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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BRUSH STACKS

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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GRAINSTACKS A

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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GRAINSTACKS B

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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GRAINSTACKS C

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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POPLARS

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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MANNEPORTE

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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CUSTOMES

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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PARLIMENT

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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PARLIMENT 2

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

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GIVERNY POND

by Bob Kessel

after Claude Monet

See more Monet inspired prints by Bob Kessel by clicking here.

TEA by Bob Kessel
Aug 25th, 2009 by admin

Bob Kessel’s art series “100 VIEWS” features pictures based on the works of Hiroshige and Hokusai. These pictures are available as signed and numbered limited edition fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for pricing and availability.

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TEA CUP by Bob Kessel

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TEA GRAY by Bob Kessel

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TEA FOR TWO by Bob Kessel

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TEA PARTY by Bob Kessel

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TEA HOUSE OLD TREE by Bob Kessel

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TEA HANAMI by Bob Kessel

LEGER by Bob Kessel
Aug 24th, 2009 by admin

“The object in modern painting must become the main character and overthrow the subject. If, in turn, the human form becomes an object, it can considerably liberate possibilities for the modern artist.”

- Fernand Léger

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BATHING by Bob Kessel after Leger

Fernand Léger (French, 1881–1955) as a young man in France, was apprenticed to an architect, then worked as an architectural draftsman and a photographic retoucher. He studied art at the École des Arts Décoratifs and the Académie Julian in Paris. Along with Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, and Juan Gris, Léger ranks among the foremost Cubist painters of the teens. Even after the height of Cubism, his paintings continued to utilize pure color and to employ forms that had been simplified into the geometric components of the cone, cube, and sphere. After World War I, when Léger became friends with Le Corbusier and Amédée Ozenfant, who were leaders of the Purist movement in Paris, his work exemplified the “machine aesthetic.”

“ART HISTORY” is an art series by Bob Kessel featuring pictures based on famous artist’s paintings throughout history like the Leger inspired print “BATHING” shown below. These pictures are available as signed and numbered limited edition fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for pricing and availability.

VINCENT VAN GOGH by Bob Kessel
Aug 17th, 2009 by admin

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DAUBIGNY by Bob Kessel
apres Vincent van Gogh

Bob Kessel’s art series “VAN GOGH” features pictures based on Vincent Van Gogh’s paintings like in the picture “DAUBIGNY” shown above. These pictures are available as signed and numbered limited edition fine art prints. Contact Bob Kessel for pricing and availability.

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GARDENER by Bob Kessel
apres Vincent van Gogh

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COTTAGES by BOb Kessel
apres Vincent van Gogh

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FIELDS by Bob Kessel
apres Vincent van Gogh

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NUDE by Bob Kessel
apres Vincent van Gogh

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PARISIENS by Bob Kessel
apres Vincent van Gogh

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WHEATFIELD by Bob Kessel
apres Vincent van Gogh

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SHOES by Bob Kessel
apres Vincent van Gogh

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ST PAULS by Bob Kessel
apres Vincent van Gogh

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SUNFLOWERS by Bob Kessel
apres Vincent van Gogh

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HERRING by Bob Kessel
apres Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh, for whom color was the chief symbol of expression, was born in Groot-Zundert, Holland. The son of a pastor, brought up in a religious and cultured atmosphere, Vincent was highly emotional and lacked self-confidence. Between 1860 and 1880, when he finally decided to become an artist, van Gogh had had two unsuitable and unhappy romances and had worked unsuccessfully as a clerk in a bookstore, an art salesman, and a preacher in the Borinage (a dreary mining district in Belgium), where he was dismissed for overzealousness. He remained in Belgium to study art, determined to give happiness by creating beauty. The works of his early Dutch period are somber-toned, sharply lit, genre paintings of which the most famous is “The Potato Eaters” (1885). In that year van Gogh went to Antwerp where he discovered the works of Rubens and purchased many Japanese prints.

In 1886 he went to Paris to join his brother Théo, the manager of Goupil’s gallery. In Paris, van Gogh studied with Cormon, inevitably met Pissarro, Monet, and Gauguin, and began to lighten his very dark palette and to paint in the short brushstrokes of the Impressionists. His nervous temperament made him a difficult companion and night-long discussions combined with painting all day undermined his health. He decided to go south to Arles where he hoped his friends would join him and help found a school of art. Gauguin did join him but with disastrous results. In a fit of epilepsy, van Gogh pursued his friend with an open razor, was stopped by Gauguin, but ended up cutting a portion of his ear lobe off. Van Gogh then began to alternate between fits of madness and lucidity and was sent to the asylum in Saint-Remy for treatment.

In May of 1890, he seemed much better and went to live in Auvers-sur-Oise under the watchful eye of Dr. Gachet. Two months later he was dead, having shot himself “for the good of all.” During his brief career he had sold one painting. Van Gogh’s finest works were produced in less than three years in a technique that grew more and more impassioned in brushstroke, in symbolic and intense color, in surface tension, and in the movement and vibration of form and line. Van Gogh’s inimitable fusion of form and content is powerful; dramatic, lyrically rhythmic, imaginative, and emotional, for the artist was completely absorbed in the effort to explain either his struggle against madness or his comprehension of the spiritual essence of man and nature.

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